SALON GROUP SHOW
Summary
 

 

Description
 

During the Enlightenment, French salons acted as incubators for social and cultural innovation. Within the arts, the salons served as both cultural hubs and platforms for the exchange of often radical ideas that continue to influence the cultural fabric and practises of the visual arts as we know them. Salon 2022, a new exhibition curated and organised by the team at TSIVRIKOS SHAKE, will reimagine the idea of the salon by bringing together a diverse group of artists committed to exploring contemporary concepts of expression, language, and identity – ideas that both influence and define cultural and societal developments in the 21st century.

In a return to the illustrious tradition of the eighteenth century salon, ‘Salon 2022’ showcases the work of eleven different artists, each working in different media and exploring different themes, from landscape and nature to minds and bodies, to environmental issues and sustainability and our relationship with technology and self presentation in the digital age. Despite operating across a range of media, the artists are united in their celebration of materiality and pushing the boundaries of their chosen medium, be it the recycled materials of Svetlana Bogatcheva’s sculptures to the dense, richly textured canvases of Geoff Uglow’s paintings or the colourful, playful textile of Anne Von Freiburg’s work. 
 

Much like the salons of the nineteenth century, Salon 2022 aims to open a dialogue, promote discourse and spark debate.

 

 

 

Artworks on sale
 ·   · 4 viewing rooms
  •  · 2 connections
Featured Viewing Rooms
CHORUS
  Fundamental to Uglow’s work is the understanding that he, as the artist, is not cast in the traditional role of observer. Conversely, he is in and of the work, the conductor amid a tempest of paint, arranging the often-bewildering cocktail of the physical, the metaphysical and the emotional into an internal cohesion. For Uglow, paint is not the expression of something understood; it is the conduit to understanding. In this, he echoes the masters of the canon, from the Venetian Cinquecento to the New York abstract expressionists. Like his forebears, he is committed to the ongoing enquiry into pure painting.   He must. After all, he paints because ‘life isn’t enough. It disappears. I need so
Observing the Human
  In her video work Messenger(s), the artist Sejin Kim observes and comments on the inherent imperialistic ambition of human nature: the desire of man to expand territories repeatedly seen throughout history is now going beyond the Earth. The protagonist of the artwork is ‘Laika the Space Dog’, who took part in the mission Sputnik 2, and  became a part of history as the first living creature to orbit the Earth. The space dog gave her life for her country, involuntarily fulfilling a canine suicide mission, with Russia announcing the cause of death 50 years later: excessive heat and stress coming from the heat adjustment error of the spaceship. The Messenger(s), reborn with a 3D digital motion
SALON GROUP SHOW
  During the Enlightenment, French salons acted as incubators for social and cultural innovation. Within the arts, the salons served as both cultural hubs and platforms for the exchange of often radical ideas that continue to influence the cultural fabric and practises of the visual arts as we know them. Salon 2022, a new exhibition curated and organised by the team at TSIVRIKOS SHAKE, will reimagine the idea of the salon by bringing together a diverse group of artists committed to exploring contemporary concepts of expression, language, and identity – ideas that both influence and define cultural and societal developments in the 21st century. In a return to the illustrious tradition of the
The Banksy Effect
An endless 'Rat Race' "They exist without permission.They are hated, hunted, and persecuted.They live in quiet desperation amongst the filth.And yet they are capable of bringing entire civilizations to their knees.”   Rats are one of Banksy's significant motives and continuous source of inspiration. They are used allegorically both as anagram of the word 'ART', and as a symbol of the vices of the human race and those who suffer treated as 'lesser than' in the darkness. For Banksy, the rat is paying homage to the graffiti artists and ,therefore, himself, who tend to appear at night, hidden in the darkness and are hunted down by the authorities, treated almost like pests.  By giving the figu

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